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House Intelligence Committee To Hold Open Hearing on Deepfakes and AI

The National Security Challenge of Artificial Intelligence, Manipulated Media, and “Deepfakes”

Washington, June 7, 2019

Washington, DC – On Thursday, June 13, 2019 at 9:00 am, the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence will convene an open hearing on the national security challenges of artificial intelligence (AI), manipulated media, and “deepfake” technology. This is the first House hearing devoted specifically to examining deepfakes and other types of AI-generated synthetic data.

Advances in machine learning algorithms have made it cheaper and easier to create deepfakes – convincing videos where people say or do things that never happened. Such advances also support the production of fake audio, imagery, and text at scale, and these capabilities are fast becoming more accessible and widely available. Deepfakes raise profound questions about national security and democratic governance, with individuals and voters no longer able to trust their own eyes or ears when assessing the authenticity of what they see on their screens. 

During this hearing, the Committee will examine the national security threats posed by AI-enabled fake content, what can be done to detect and combat it, and what role the public sector, the private sector, and society as a whole should play to counter a potentially grim, “post-truth” future.

Among other topics, the Committee will seek testimony on:

  • Future advancements in deepfake technology;
  • Detecting and tracking deepfakes;
  • How deepfakes could allow people to deny legitimate media;
  • The enduring psychological impact of deepfakes;
  • Counterintelligence risks;
  • Internet platforms’ role in policing fake content;
  • The difficult legal challenges raised by deepfakes; and
  • The appropriate role for the U.S. government.

The Committee has invited the following witnesses to attend:

  • Danielle Citron, Professor of Law, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law
  • Jack Clark, Policy Director, OpenAI
  • Dr. David Doermann, Professor, SUNY Empire Innovation and Director, Artificial Intelligence Institute, University at Buffalo
  • Clint Watts, Distinguished Research Fellow, Foreign Policy Research Institute, and Senior Fellow, Alliance for Securing Democracy, German Marshall Fund

Details:

What: The National Security Challenge of Artificial Intelligence, Manipulated Media, and “Deepfakes” (Open Hearing)

When: Thursday, June 13, 2019; 9:00 am

Where: 1100 Longworth House Office Building

Livestream: The hearing will be livestreamed here.

All media wishing to attend this hearing must be credentialed through the House Radio & TV Gallery at (202) 225-5214. All TV camera crews should RSVP to the House Radio & TV Gallery. Media seating will be first come, first serve.

Below are the witness biographies:

Danielle Citron, Professor of Law, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Danielle Keats Citron is the Morton & Sophia Macht Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law where she has taught for fifteen years. On July 1, 2019, she is joining the faculty of Boston University School of Law as a Professor of Law. In addition to her home institutions, she is an Affiliate Scholar at Stanford Law School’s Center on Internet & Society, Affiliate Fellow at Yale Law School’s Information Society Project, Tech Fellow at NYU Law’s Policing Project, and Faculty Associate at Harvard Law School’s Berkman Klein Center on Internet & Society.

She is a member of the American Law Institute where she has been an adviser to the Restatement Third, Information Privacy Principles Project. She has written extensively about privacy, free speech, and civil rights, publishing more than 30 articles in major law reviews and scores of opinion pieces for major news outlets.  Her book Hate Crimes In Cyberspace (Harvard University Press) tackled the phenomenon of cyber stalking.

>> Danielle Citron's Statement for the Record

Jack Clark, Policy Director, OpenAI

Jack Clark is the Policy Director for OpenAI, where he focuses on AI policy and strategy. He frequently participates in fact-finding studies and forums relating to AI, including events in recent years with the GAO and the Army Cyber Institute. He recently joined the Center for a New American Security task force on AI and national security. A frequent public speaker, Jack has given numerous talks about artificial intelligence and its impact on policy, ethics, and security, with recent talks covering AI and dual-use for a CNAS event in 2017, and issues of AI policy for the opening keynote of a Princeton conference on AI and Ethics in March 2018.

He also helps run the AI Index, an initiative from the Stanford One Hundred Year Study on AI to track and analyze AI progress. In addition, he writes a weekly newsletter about cutting-edge AI research and applications called Import AI (www.importai.net), which is read by read by more than twenty thousand experts around the world.

>> Jack Clark's Statement for the Record

Dr. David Doermann, Professor, SUNY Empire Innovation and Director, Artificial Intelligence Institute, University at Buffalo

Dr. David Doermann is a Professor of Empire Innovation at the University at Buffalo (UB) and the Director of the University at Buffalo Artificial Intelligence Institute. Prior to his position at UB he was a program manager at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) where he developed, selected and oversaw approximately $150 million in research and transition funding in the areas of computer vision, human language technologies and voice analytics.

From 1993 to 2018, David was a member of the research faculty at the University of Maryland, College Park. In his role in the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, he served as Director of the Laboratory for Language and Media Processing, and as an adjunct member of the graduate faculty for the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

>> Dr. David Doermann's Statement for the Record

Clint Watts, Distinguished Research Fellow, Foreign Policy Research Institute, and Senior Fellow, Alliance for Securing Democracy, German Marshall Fund

Clint Watts is a Distinguished Research Fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, Non-Resident Fellow at the Alliance for Securing Democracy and Senior Fellow at the Center for Cyber and Homeland Security at George Washington University. He recently examined the rise of social media influence by publishing his first book in 2018 entitled Messing With The Enemy: Surviving in a Social Media World of Hackers, Terrorists, Russians and Fake News.

His research and writing focuses on terrorism, counterterrorism, social media influence and Russian disinformation. Clint’s tracking of terrorist foreign fighters allowed him to predict the rise of the Islamic State over al Qaeda in 2014. From 2014 – 2016, Clint worked with a team to track and model the rise of Russian influence operations via social media leading up to the U.S. Presidential election of 2016. This research led Clint to testify before four different Senate committees in 2017 and 2018 regarding Russia’s information warfare campaign against the U.S. and the West.

Before becoming a consultant, Clint served as a U.S. Army infantry officer, a FBI Special Agent, as the Executive Officer of the Combating Terrorism Center at West Point (CTC), as a consultant to the FBI’s Counter Terrorism Division (CTD) and National Security Branch (NSB), and as an analyst supporting the U.S. Intelligence Community and U.S. Special Operations Command.

>> Clint Watts' Statement for the Record

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